Main

Bpeace Blog Briefs

Stories of bravery, transformation and impact.

Bpeace HQ

[caption id="attachment_3055" align="alignright" width="236"] Abdul Rashid Reshad[/caption]

It's been eight months since Abdul Rashid Reshad travelled to the U.S.  on the Bpeace Apprentice Road Trip.  Since returning home to Afghanistan, he has transformed his for-profit vocational school and it was recently accredited by the Afghan government as a University.  He has hired 25 people, most of them new faculty.

Reshad is the founder and owner of Reshad Educational and Higher Educational Institutes in northern Afghanistan.  As one of Bpeace's most successful Fast Runner entrepreneurs, we asked him for the secrets to his success.

Q:  You are a very successful businessman. What strengths or skills make you successful?

A:  “I have been successful through continuing to improve my own knowledge and my team’s managerial capacity. I joined social and cultural groups that allow me to network locally. Now, the people in my city support me. Most importantly, I am honest and hardworking.”

Q:  What distinguishes your University from other programs in Afghanistan? What makes the Reshad School special?

A:  “My University is different from others in my city. We have a democratic atmosphere and we provide entertainment and extra-curricular opportunities for the students. We also conduct trainings for the entire staff. This is unique to our school”

Q:  It took you many months to receive your University License. What challenged did you face throughout the process?

A:  “There are many procedures that needed to be passed. I had to get special documents for all the teachers. We had a shortage of financing. It was also the first time I was working with Ministry of Higher Education. All of the roles and procedures were new to me.”

Q:  Were there times when you did not think you would receive your license? How did you overcome those times? 

A:  “I dream of being an international educator. I believe in building my country through education. Sometimes, I was upset and frustrated but my vision allowed me to struggle through the challenges. I contacted other private universities and sought guidance and support. Learning from my colleagues was a great help. Afghanistan is suffering because of our lack of education and that always continues to motivate me."

Q: How many women attend your educational institute? What are you doing to encourage women to attend your school?

A: "Currently we have 28 women (13%) enrolled on our higher education Institutes, 12 of them attend for free through our scholarship programs. Because of unique economic challenges Afghan women face, they represent a low percentage of students in my Institutes. To encourage women to attend, I decrease the fees for women; provide scholarships; and in the future will provide them post-graduation with career services to help them find employment."

Q:  When you look at the future, what is the next big goal for your business? 

A:  “My first goal is to strengthen the quality and quantity of my Institutes. I want to establish more branches in other provinces in Afghanistan and create more fields of study. I am interested in creating partnerships with international universities. I want to grow my school internationally."

Q:  What advice do you have for other business owners in Afghanistan? 

A:  “All business owners must have a strategic plan. It is very important to keep learning more about your industry and general business skills. Never stop being creative."

Q:  What do you want to tell people in the United States about growing your business? 

A:  “I am pleased to learn skills and different achievements from Bpeace and the U.S. State Department. I am grateful for being invited to the United States to learn. It has really helped me promote my business. I am 100% sure I am doing right thing in the right time for my country."

Q:  What do you want people in the United States to know about business in Afghanistan?

A:  “Afghanistan still needs support. We have achieved a lot since 2002: democracy, private business sectors (especially in education), a human rights delegation, a growing media, and freedom of speech. Every day Afghan businesses are growing. We still have new resources to grow our businesses but Afghans need international partners to work and share. We still need industry expertise and experience to support our efforts and exchange mutual business benefits.”

You can contact Reshad directly at rashidreshad@yahoo.com or +93 799 154 137

[caption id="attachment_3055" align="alignright" width="236"] Abdul Rashid Reshad[/caption]

It's been eight months since Abdul Rashid Reshad travelled to the U.S.  on the Bpeace Apprentice Road Trip.  Since returning home to Afghanistan, he has transformed his for-profit vocational school and it was recently accredited by the Afghan government as a University.  He has hired 25 people, most of them new faculty.

Reshad is the founder and owner of Reshad Educational and Higher Educational Institutes in northern Afghanistan.  As one of Bpeace's most successful Fast Runner entrepreneurs, we asked him for the secrets to his success.

Q:  You are a very successful businessman. What strengths or skills make you successful?

A:  “I have been successful through continuing to improve my own knowledge and my team’s managerial capacity. I joined social and cultural groups that allow me to network locally. Now, the people in my city support me. Most importantly, I am honest and hardworking.”

Q:  What distinguishes your University from other programs in Afghanistan? What makes the Reshad School special?

A:  “My University is different from others in my city. We have a democratic atmosphere and we provide entertainment and extra-curricular opportunities for the students. We also conduct trainings for the entire staff. This is unique to our school”

Q:  It took you many months to receive your University License. What challenged did you face throughout the process?

A:  “There are many procedures that needed to be passed. I had to get special documents for all the teachers. We had a shortage of financing. It was also the first time I was working with Ministry of Higher Education. All of the roles and procedures were new to me.”

Q:  Were there times when you did not think you would receive your license? How did you overcome those times? 

A:  “I dream of being an international educator. I believe in building my country through education. Sometimes, I was upset and frustrated but my vision allowed me to struggle through the challenges. I contacted other private universities and sought guidance and support. Learning from my colleagues was a great help. Afghanistan is suffering because of our lack of education and that always continues to motivate me."

Q: How many women attend your educational institute? What are you doing to encourage women to attend your school?

A: "Currently we have 28 women (13%) enrolled on our higher education Institutes, 12 of them attend for free through our scholarship programs. Because of unique economic challenges Afghan women face, they represent a low percentage of students in my Institutes. To encourage women to attend, I decrease the fees for women; provide scholarships; and in the future will provide them post-graduation with career services to help them find employment."

Q:  When you look at the future, what is the next big goal for your business? 

A:  “My first goal is to strengthen the quality and quantity of my Institutes. I want to establish more branches in other provinces in Afghanistan and create more fields of study. I am interested in creating partnerships with international universities. I want to grow my school internationally."

Q:  What advice do you have for other business owners in Afghanistan? 

A:  “All business owners must have a strategic plan. It is very important to keep learning more about your industry and general business skills. Never stop being creative."

Q:  What do you want to tell people in the United States about growing your business? 

A:  “I am pleased to learn skills and different achievements from Bpeace and the U.S. State Department. I am grateful for being invited to the United States to learn. It has really helped me promote my business. I am 100% sure I am doing right thing in the right time for my country."

Q:  What do you want people in the United States to know about business in Afghanistan?

A:  “Afghanistan still needs support. We have achieved a lot since 2002: democracy, private business sectors (especially in education), a human rights delegation, a growing media, and freedom of speech. Every day Afghan businesses are growing. We still have new resources to grow our businesses but Afghans need international partners to work and share. We still need industry expertise and experience to support our efforts and exchange mutual business benefits.”

You can contact Reshad directly at rashidreshad@yahoo.com or +93 799 154 137

Add comment

     


Security code
Refresh

Subscribe to Our Blog

Receive Bpeace blogs to your inbox. We will never sell or share your information.

Recent Posts

  • Using Your Experience to Serve Others Is Inspiring All Around: Yvette Franco +

       Yvette Franco (left) with Carmen Reyes (right), founder of Belleza Total in Guatemala Seizing an opportunity to share your skills, talents and knowledge with those who can benefit from Read More
  • Champions of Peace Cross the Finish Line Big-Time at the 2016 Gala +

      It was a truly Olympian-style celebration on May 5 at Capitale in downtown Manhattan as more than 250 dedicated Bpeace contenders rallied for the Champions of Peace Gala. Read More
  • Virtual Mentoring: For Janice Chaka, it’s as real as being there +

    Photo: Karina’s employees hard at work.  Volunteering within a busy schedule: It can be done Before Janice Chaka dealt hands in British casinos, before she moved from her native England Read More
  • Fast Runner Snapshot: Rosa Maria Zamora +

    Country:  Guatemala  Business:  Manufacturas en Madera, a family-run company with two lines of business—high-end custom wood interiors and millwork for commercial applications, and church furniture (mainly pews) Read More
  • Celebrating the 2015 VERAs and the Organization We Return to Year After Year +

      In 2012, after learning about Bpeace from a friend, I joined as a volunteer. At this year’s Annual Meeting, Bpeace awarded its annual VERAs (Volunteer Excellence Recognition Awards), and Read More
  • 1
  • 2

Find us on Facebook

 

 

Find us on Twitter

Sitemap